William Carroll Pace

William Carroll Pace

Male 1826 - Aft 1870  (~ 45 years)

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  • Name William Carroll Pace 
    Born ca 1826  Rutherford Co, Tennessee, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Property, Real 23 Nov 1846  Rutherford Co, Tennessee, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Wm & John King to Carroll Pace. The deed is for forty acres, more or less, on the East fork of Stones river, from William King & John King to William Pace & William Carroll Pace, for the sum of Eighty dollars. 
    • Rutherford County, Tennessee Deed Book 5, 57, No. 89.
    Property, Real 29 Nov 1847  Rutherford Co, Tennessee, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    George Gannon & wife to William C. Pace. The deed, dated November 29, 1847, is from George Gannon & Rebecca Gannon (formerly Rebecca Pace) two tracts in district 19, the first tract estimated at thirty acres. The second tract was adjacent to a tract originally owned by Brittan Pace. The total deed is for 85 acres and the price was $25.00. 
    • Tennessee. Rutherford County. Deed Book 4, 711-712, No. 922.
    Tax Records 1849  Rutherford Co, Tennessee, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    District No. 19, McCrackins. Poll tax - 1; total state and county tax - 30 cents. 
    • Work Progress Administration. Tennessee Records of Rutherford County: Tax List 1849 (Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1938), 95.
    Census 1850  Rutherford Co, Tennessee, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    McCrackins District, p 253B, dwelling/family 67/67, farmer, real estate value $600; b. Tennessee, enumerated 23 Aug 1850 by E. D. Manecok. 
    • The United States of America. Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. Seventh Census of the United States, 1850. Washington, D.C.: National Archives, 1850. (NARA microfilm M432 roll 894)
    1850 Census for Rutherford County, Tennessee, McCrackins District, Sheet 253B
    1850 Census for Rutherford County, Tennessee, McCrackins District, Sheet 253B
    Pace, Carroll W....23...head
    ____, Mary.........23...wife
    ____, Sarah J...... 2...daughter
    ____, Margaret A...11/12...daughter
    Tax Records 1852  Marion Co, Arkansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Poll tax - 1. 
    Turnbo Manuscripts 1852  Marion Co, Arkansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    One among the roughest streams in North Arkansas is Jimmies Creek in Marion County, which empties into White River just below the mouths of the Two Sisters Creeks. Jimmies Creek is noted for its many rugged mountains gulches and rough hollows, but never the less it is inhabited by several industrious families and a few people settled along this watercourse several years before the war. Among the residents here is Billy Parker son of John Garrison Parker and Mary (Johnson) Parker. Billy Parker was born in Rutherford County, Tennessee October 29, 1832, and when he was grown up to be a young man he turned his head westward, he arrived at Yellville in Marion County Ark. in the year 1850. He said that Yellville was only a small country village then and contained only two small stores. Jim Berry owned one of them and Bob Jefferson and Jess Wickersham was the proprietors of the other store. Some of the names of the other citizens who lived at Yellville at the time were John Wickersham and Jim Wickersham who were brothers to Jess Wickersham. There was another Wickersham whose given name was George. There were also Prink Jefferson and the old man Jefferson, Gid Thompson, John Estes, Garrison Phillips, Dr. William Oowdry, Jess Young, and Judge Wood. "I remember," said Mr. Parker "that George Wickersham was accused of killing Tutt by ambushing him in the bluff at the town while Mr. Tutt was going down the creek. Alph Burns shot and killed Doe Treat who weighed 250 pounds. I. C. (Ice) Stinnette was sheriff of Marion County when I come to Yellville in 1850. Billy Brown succeeded him in the sheriffs office. After Mr. Brown was killed, Mr. Stinnette served again as sheriff. I have a fresh recollection that when Brown was killed and after John and Randolph Coker was put in jail at Yellville I was appointed as one of the guards to watch the jail and prevent the escape of the Coker boys who were chained together. During one dark night while a violent thunder and rain storm was passing over someone got into the jailhouse and cut the chains off of the ankles of the Coker boys and lead them out of the jailhouse and the two prisoners made their escape. But I was not on guard that night.

    I moved to Jimmies Creek in 1852 and bought an improvement from Mr. Elam McCracken who come to Jimmies Creek in 1851. There were hundreds of wolves on this stream when we went there. My wife whose name is Elizabeth and who is a daughter of Elam McCracken had a busy time keeping the wolves from destroying all of our flock of sheep. Some of the early residents of Jimmies Creek were Jimmie Lawson, William Jones commonly known as ‘Flatty’ Jim Gage, John McVey, Jones Osburn, Jim Lovell, and Carl Pace. Bill Flippin was the first man I heard preach on Jimmies Creek which occurred long before the war where the wild cat school house now is. Carl Pace taught the first school in this neighborhood which was taught in the year 1857 in a small log house that John Parker built on Wild Cat Creek which empties into Jimmies Creek. John Pangle was the man who built the little water mill on Jimmies before the Civil War commenced. This little corn cracker stood just below where Kingdom Springs is now." 
    • Silas Claiborne Turnbo. "Brief Items Of Interest Which Occurred at Yellville and on Jimmie's Creek in the Long Ago," The Turnbo Manuscripts electronic resource at the Springfield-Green County Libraries, Springfield, Missouri.
    Tax Records 1853  Marion Co, Arkansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Poll tax - 1, 1 slave. 
    Tax Records 1854  Marion Co, Arkansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Poll tax - 1, 1 slave. 
    Tax Records 1855  Marion Co, Arkansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Poll tax - 1, 1 slave. 
    Occupation 1857  Jimmie Creek, Marion Co, Arkansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    One among the roughest streams in North Arkansas is Jimmies Creek in Marion County, which empties into White River just below the mouths of the Two Sisters Creeks. Jimmies Creek is noted for its many rugged mountains gulches and rough hollows, but never the less it is inhabited by several industrious families and a few people settled along this watercourse several years before the war...Some of the early residents of Jimmies Creek were Jimmie Lawson, William Jones commonly known as ‘Flatty’ Jim Gage, John McVey, Jones Osburn, Jim Lovell, and Carl Pace. Bill Flippin was the first man I heard preach on Jimmies Creek which occurred long before the war where the wild cat school house now is. Carl Pace taught the first school in this neighborhood which was taught in the year 1857 in a small log house that John Parker built on Wild Cat Creek which empties into Jimmies Creek. John Pangle was the man who built the little water mill on Jimmies before the Civil War commenced. This little corn cracker stood just below where Kingdom Springs is now." 
    • Silas Claiborne Turnbo. "Brief Items of Interest which Occurred at Yellville and on Jimmies Creek in the Long Ago" The Turnbo Manuscripts located at the Springfield-Greene County Public Library, Springfield, Missouri.
    Tax Records 1859  Marion Co, Arkansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Poll tax - 1, 1 slave. 
    Census 1860  Marion Co, Arkansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Jimmies Creek twp, Yellville PO, p 125, dwelling/family 867/1; farmer, personal property valued $1787, b. Tennessee; enumerated 24 Jul 1860 by Wm C. Mitchell.  
    1860 Census for Marion County, Arkansas, Jimmies Creek Township, Sheet 125
    1860 Census for Marion County, Arkansas, Jimmies Creek Township, Sheet 125
    Pace, William C...33...head
    ____, Mary E......33...wife
    ____, Elizabeth...10...daughter
    ____, Margaret.... 9...daughter
    ____, William..... 5...son
    ____, John........ 3...son
    ____, Anna A...... 1...daughter
    Tax Records 1860  Marion Co, Arkansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Poll tax - 1, 1 slave. 
    Military 1861-1862  Civil War Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Captain, Co A, 14th Arkansas Infantry, C.S.A. Enlisted at Yellville, Arkansas, 8 Jul 1861; resigned and was dropped from the rolls, 9 May 1862. 
    • Rena Marie Knight. Confederate Soldiers Buried in Arkansas (Jacksonville, AR: RMK Publishing, 1999), 222.
    Confederate Regiment Organized in Boone County[, Arkansas]
    Confederate Regiment Organized in Boone County[, Arkansas]
    The Fourteenth Arkansas Infantry, C.S.A. was organized in August, 1861, by State senator William C. Mitchell near old Lead Hill Cemetery in Boone County. This article describes the organization and enlistment of the men, supplies gathered and their participation in the battle of Pea Ridge and future battles during the Civil War. [Source: Boone County Historian Volume III, No. 1 (Harrison, AR: Boone County Historical & Genealogy Society, 1980), 14-22.]
    Military 25 Mar 1862  Camp Ben McCulloch, Arkansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Resignation Documents of Captain William C. Pace, 14th Arkansas Volunteer Infantry, C.S.A.
    Resignation Documents of Captain William C. Pace, 14th Arkansas Volunteer Infantry, C.S.A.
    Contains (1) handwritten resignation of William C. Pace, Captain, 14 Regt. Arkansas Volunteer Infantry, C.S.A. (2) Affidavit from J. B. Carlisle, Acting Surgeon stating that Pace's prior "injury to some of his ribs on both sides were fractured and also injury of the Sternum"...recent exposure has so impaired his general health as to incapacitate him for the performance of duty and...will not be able to resume his duties during his unexpired term of service." (3) other cover sheets.
    Turnbo Manuscripts Aug 1863  Marion Co, Arkansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Among the rough steep hills and deep hollows of Sister Creek on the south side of White River in Marion County, Arkansas, lives Joe Pace, son of Carl Pace and Mary M. Pace. Joe was born on Jimmie’s Creek October 17, 1853. Mr. Carl Pace settled a claim on Jimmie’s Creek one mile above the mouth of Wild Cat Creek where Joe Pace was born. Joe’s parents have both passed over the great beyond and their bodies rest in the same grave yard near the Wild Cat school house on Jimmie’s Creek. Joe Pace is the proprietor of Pace’s Ferry on White River just above the mouth of Sister Creek and 4 miles below the little town of Oakland. Mr. Joe Pace relates the following war story which he says is strictly true. "My father, Carl Pace, was a captain of a company in the 14-th (confederate) Arkansas Infantry. My mother was a sister of Tomps McCracken and a daughter of Joe McCracken. In the month of August, 1863, Jimmie’s Creek was invaded for the first time by a Small command of federal troops of mounted men. My father was at home then on a leave of absence. Jim Skinner was then living on the Van Lants place on the south bank of the river Just above the mouth of Sister Creek. This man had observed the federals passing down the river on the north side where the old George Pearson farm is Mr. Skinner set about at once to give warning of the approach of the federals to the few settlers who lived on Jimmie’s Creek and the other settlements toward Yellville for the river was at a low stage and easily forded. So mounting a horse he galloped down to the mouth of Sister Creek before the federals reached the ford there and up that stream a short distance then over the dividing ridge to Jimmie’s Creek then up that water course to where my father lived above the mouth of Wild Cat. When Mr. Skinner arrived at our house the strength of his horse was entirely exhausted and his body was covered with sweat and foam. As the man approached the house he hallooed to father. "Captain Pace, the feds are coming and I have come to warn you of their approach. My horse is give out and I cannot ride him any further." Mr. Skinner now abandoned the horse and ran into the bresh to hide from the enemy and father hastily caught a bay mule he called Jack and mounted him and urged him into a gallop to notify his neighbors of the coming of the enemy. It seems that the federals had seen Mr. Skinner galloping down the river on the south side and believing that he was intending to give the settlers warning of their approach they pushed on across the river and followed the fresh trail of Skinner’s horse as rapidly as their horses could travel and about the time my father got out of our eight we seen a federal galloping up the road toward the house with a pistol in his hand. The man galloped on by the house without halting or asking a question and followed the same road that my father had just gone over. When my father had galloped the mule near a half a mile up the creek or just below where Kingdom Spring is now he heard horses feet coming up behind him and he stopped and turned the mule across the road to wait to see if it was a friend getting out of the way of the enemy. In a few moments the horseman come in view and it proved to be an armed federal and who was only a few yards from him. My father had his pistol buckled around him but he made no attempt to draw the weapon from the scabbard but waited until the federal soldier had galloped up to him with pistol in hand. The federal made no effort to use the pistol nor did ask father to surrender neither did he ask him if he was armed. But when the federal reached him he stopped and says, "You have gone far enough in this direction" "Well, " says my father, "which way do you want me to go." "Let us go back the other way." replied the man in blue, "Very well, turn your horse In the way you desire to go," said father and the federal who was still holding the pistol in his hand reined his horse around and started back down the creek. My father never moved until the federal got a few yards off when he jerked his pistol from the scabbard and shot the federal and wounded him causing the man in blue to jerk both his feet out of the stirrups and without turning in his saddle he placed the Pistol under his arm with the muzzle pointing toward my father and fired a shot at random and immediately urged his horse into a gallop down the creek, Father shot at the federal twice more before he got beyond his view. The ball from the pistol in the hands of the federal struck father in the thigh. The wounded federal galloped back to our house where he met his command which had just arrived and he says to them., "Boys, I am shot." The other federals ask him "Did you hit him." "I don’t know," said he, "but go on and if you can find him give him hell. And they all started up the road the way the wounded man had come. My father knew that the federals would make an effort to hunt him down and decided that it would be best to dismount and leave the mule and seek a place of safety among the crags and cliffs along the creek. But after he got off of the mule he discovered that the ball shot at him by the federal had broke his thigh and he could neither walk or remount the mule again. He was suffering intense pain and the wound was bleeding freely. He was in a helpless condition and powerless to get out of the way on foot. But he must make an effort to leave the road and leaving the mule standing in the road he crawled 40 yards to a shelving rock which lay close down to the ground where there was just barely room for him to crawl under it. He had just got under the rock and was suffering an agony of pain when he heard the clattering of a number of horses feet over the stony ground coming up the road. It proved to be a body of federal cavalry and they soon reached the mule which by this time had got out of the road and was grazing. One of the troopers dismounted and tried to catch the mule but his muleship refused to be friendly and started off on father’s trail where he had pulled himself along to the cliff and as he went along he would put his nose down to the ground and smell where father had crawled along. "The commander of the troopers says, "Oh., dam the mule. Shoot it down and let us push on." And the man who was trying to catch the mule answered, "Go ahead, I’ll catch the mule and overtake you." And while the man was following on behind the mule trying to coax it to stop the mule walked up in 6 feet of the ledge of rock that father was under and knowing that if the federal saw him he would shoot him instantly my father made ready to defend himself the best he could. Two barrels of his revolver were loaded and he cocked the pistol and aimed it at the man with the intention of shooting him if the man discovered him. Though suffering terrible pain from his broken thigh yet he held the pistol on the federal who was so busy in trying to catch the mule that he never discovered father nor heard the click of the pistol. Directly the man succeeded in catching the mule and lead him back to the road and remounting his horse he rode on in the direction his friends had went leading the mule at the side of his horse. This was at 2 o’clock in the afternoon. My mother not knowing that father was hurt and supposing he had escaped, she concluded it was best to get off of the public road where we lived and she took us children which was 7 in number and went to a relative of ours of the name of Bill King who lived off from the public highways one mile and a half from our house.

    On the following day at 10 a.m. I took one of our horses out into the woods and hobbled him to prevent the federals from capturing him. Just as I had finished tieing the rope around his legs and had rose to my feet I heard my father call me and I answered and ran to him. When I reached the spot where he lay wounded and very weak I was horrified to find him in such a terrible condition. The first words he said to me after I had got to him was "Joe, is the feds gone yet." and I replied "Yes, father, they are all gone as far as I know." My father had crawled one mile and a half from where he was shot and was almost perished for the want of water. He said that he had not tasted a bit of water since he was wounded. He says "Joe, run to Bill’s house and get me some water. I am nearly starved for a drink." It was near 300 yards to Bill King’s house and I ran with all might to tell my mother and Mr. King and his wife about father’s helpless condition. I took some water in a vessel and got back to father first. He wanted to drink all the water In the vessel but I told him that he was so nigh starved to death for water that he must only drink a small quantity of water at a time and it would not hurt him but if he drank it all at once it would kill him and I would not let him drink only a little at a time until his great thirst was partly quenched. By this time my mother and the other children and Mr. King and his family got there and we went for other help immediately and made a litter of small poles tacked together and spread a quilt on it for a bed and we lifted him up and put him on it and carried him 3 miles to a cliff of rock in a wild and lonely looking place in a N.W. direction from home where the Star mine is now on Wild Cat Creek and placed the suffering man in as comfortable position as circumstances would admit and my mother sent a runner to Yellville for two doctors—Jobe and Hansford—and they both come and dressed his wounds and we all cared for him and gave him our beat attention until he was able to be moved to safer and more comfortable quarters. I and my mother was with him nearly all the time. It was two months before he was able to travel. The wounded federal was taken to my grandfather’s Joe McCraken who lived on Jimmie’s Creek below our house. On the night following the day the wounded federal was carried there a number of men collected at the cliff where we had carried my father on Wild Cat Creek and wanted to go mob the wounded man in blue. Some said hang him, others wanted to shoot him, a few said let us stab him to death with knives. It seemed that the ill fated soldier was doomed to die a cruel death, but my dear old father suffering the agonizing pains of the dying pleaded for the life of the federal and finally prevailed on the mob to let the wounded soldier live and treat him well—that he was wounded and in a helpless condition and it was their duty to care for him in a merciful way and when he was able to go to send him back to his friends and they all consented to do so and they treated him kindly and when he was able to travel they sent him home. His name was Josephus Liverpoole. Soon after the close of the war he wrote a letter to my father and father answered him and they carried on a friendly correspondence until Mr. Liverpoole died, then his father wrote to us several times afterward. They both died good friends to each other. 
    • The date of Captain William Carroll Pace's shooting is incorrect because he resigned in 1862. See his above resignation papers. Silas Claiborne Turnbo. "A Bloody Encounter Between a Confederate Officer and a Federal Soldier on Jimmie's Creek," The Turnbo Manuscripts electronic resource at the Springfield-Green County Libraries, Springfield, Missouri.
    Tax Records 1866  Marion Co, Arkansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Poll tax - 1. 
    Census 1870  Marion Co, Arkansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    James Creek twp, Yellville PO, p 5 [stamped 495A], dwelling/family 34/34, farmer, value of personal property $300; b. Tennessee; enumerated 16 Jul 1870 by H. W. Hudson. 
    1870 Census for Marion County, Arkansas, James Creek Township, Sheet 5 [stamped 495A]
    1870 Census for Marion County, Arkansas, James Creek Township, Sheet 5 [stamped 495A]
    Pace, William.........44...head
    ____, Mary E..........44...wife
    ____, Elizebith C.....19...daughter
    ____, Margrett J......17...daughter
    ____, William J.......15...son
    ____, John L..........13...son
    ____, Anna A..........11...daughter
    ____, Mary L.......... 3...daughter
    ____, William L....... 1...son
    Died Aft 1870  Marion Co, Arkansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Reburied 1948–1950  Fairview Cemetery, Marion Co, Arkansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    William Carroll Pace
    William Carroll Pace
    Captain, Co A, 14th Arkansas Infantry
    Civil War - C.S.A.
    Plot: Moved from Wildcat Cemetery grave #258 to #18 when Bull Shoals Dam was built.
    Person ID I740  My Genealogy
    Last Modified 14 Mar 2021 

    Father William Brittain Pace, Jr.,   b. ca 1773, Edgecombe Co, North Carolina, British America Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. ca 1862, Rutherford Co, Tennessee, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 89 years) 
    Mother Mary Isabella Fortenberry,   b. ca 1774, North Carolina, British America Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. ca 1856, McCrackins, Rutherford Co, Tennessee, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 82 years) 
    Married 22 May 1793  North Carolina, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F10940  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Mary Emily McCracken,   b. ca 1827, Rutherford Co, Tennessee, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Jan 1880, Marion Co, Arkansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 53 years) 
    Married 19 Feb 1847  Rutherford Co, Tennessee, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • (1) Edythe Rucker Whitley. Marriages of Rutherford County, Tennessee 1804-1872 (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co, Inc, 1981), 119. (2) Bryon & Barbara Sistler. Early Middle Tennessee Marriages, Vol 1: Grooms (Nashville: Bryon & Associates, Inc., 1988), 413. (3) Bryon & Barbara Sistler. Early Middle Tennessee Marriages, Vol 2: Brides (Nashville: Bryon & Associates, Inc., 1988), 357.
    Children 
    +1. Elizabeth C. Pace,   b. ca 1851, Rutherford Co, Tennessee, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Marion Co, Arkansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location
    +2. Margaret Elizabeth Pace,   b. Oct 1849, Northfork Twp, Marion Co, Arkansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Jun 1927, Muskogee Co, Oklahoma, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 77 years)
    +3. Joseph William Pace,   b. 17 Oct 1853, Marion Co, Arkansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. ca 1934, Wetumka, Hughes Co, Oklahoma, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 80 years)
     4. John Lambert Pace,   b. ca 1856, Rutherford Co, Tennessee, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1870, Marion Co, Arkansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 15 years)
    +5. Anna Adeline Pace,   b. 15 Oct 1857, Marion Co, Arkansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Aug 1926, Peel, Marion Co, Arkansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 68 years)
    +6. Mary Letha Pace,   b. 9 Apr 1866, Pace's Ferry, Marion Co, Arkansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Apr 1955, Peel, Marion Co, Arkansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 89 years)
    +7. William Thompson Pace,   b. 26 Dec 1869, Marion Co, Arkansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Feb 1953, Marion Co, Arkansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 83 years)
    Last Modified 31 May 2018 
    Family ID F361  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsMilitary - Captain, Co A, 14th Arkansas Infantry, C.S.A. Enlisted at Yellville, Arkansas, 8 Jul 1861; resigned and was dropped from the rolls, 9 May 1862. - 1861-1862 - Civil War Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - Reburied 1948–1950 - Fairview Cemetery, Marion Co, Arkansas, USA Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Photos
    William Carroll & Mary Emily (McCracken) Pace
    William Carroll & Mary Emily (McCracken) Pace