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The Genealogy of the Wallace - Foster Family

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1
6th Regiment Missouri State Militia Cavalry
6th Regiment Missouri State Militia Cavalry
Describes the actions that the 6th Regiment Missouri State Military Cavalry participated in during the Civil War.
 
2
<i>History of Tennessee</i>
History of Tennessee
Sullivan County lies on the Virginia border immediately west of Johnson County from which it is separated by the Holston Mountain. The surface of the county is undulating, and the soil generally good. The principal valleys are Denton, Holston Cook, and Beaver Creek. The largest stream is the Holston River, which traverses the eastern portion of the county, flowing in a southwesterly course until it reaches the Washington County line where it is joined by the Watauga. It then runs in a northwesterly direction to its confluence with the North Fork at Kingsport. Its chief tributaries are Sinking Creek, Beaver Creek, Fall Creek, Kendrick Creek, Muddy Creek, and Reedy Creek.


The date at which the first permanent settlements were made in Sullivan County is placed by Haywood and Ramsey in 1769. Some local antiquarians, however, assert that a much earlier date is the correct one, but they offer little satisfactory evidence to support their assertions. The fort on the Holston River opposite the upper end of Long Island, an account of which is given in another chapter, was built by a regiment of British troops under Col. Bird, in the autumn of 1758, and was occupied by them during the following winter. At this time a few settlers located in the vicinity, but they were soon compelled to retire east of the Kanawha. During the next ten years, many hunting and exploring expedition parties traversed the Holston Valley, but no permanent settlements were made as low down as the present Tennessee line, until late in 1768 or early in 1769. On November 5, 1768, a treaty of cession was made at Fort Stanwix, NY, with the Six Nations, by the terms of which, they and their descendants relinquished all rights and title to the lands north and east of the Tennessee and Holston Rivers. On October 14 of the same year, a treaty was made at Hard Labour, in South Carolina, with the Cherokees, who also claimed the territory. By this treaty, the boundary lines of the Cherokee hunting grounds were fixed.



These two treaties afforded an opportunity for the expansion of the settlements which had been made on the Holston in Virginia. The Colonists who had been waiting upon the frontiers longing to plunge into the wilderness to locate claims, or to take possession of grants already surveyed, lost no time in doing so. Haywood relates that early in 1769, Gilbert Christian, William Anderson, John Sawyers, and four others entered upon an exploring expedition down the Holston. They penetrated as low down as Big Creek in Hawkins County, where they met a large party of Indians and were forced to retreat. They turned about and went back up the river ten or fifteen miles, concluded to return home. About twenty miles above the North Fork they found upon their return a cabin on every spot where the range was good, and where only six weeks before nothing was to be seen but a howling wilderness. When they passed by before on their outward destination they found no settlers on the Holston, save three families on the head springs of that river.

Prior to 1779, the portion of what is now Sullivan County north of the Holston was believed to be in Virginia, and the first grants were issued by that State. The earliest one of which there is any record was issued to Edmund Pendleton in 1766, for 3,000 acres of land on Reedy Creek. of the early settlers only a few of the most prominent can be mentioned. One of the largest and most highly respected families was the Rheas. Joseph Rhea, a Presbyterian minister, came again to the settlement, this time accompanies by his son, John Rhea. He bought land on Beaver Creek, and while in Maryland the next year, preparing to move his family, he died. In 1778 Mrs. Rhea came with the family. Of the sons, John became the most prominent. He was the first clerk of the county court and early became a leading attorney. In 1796 he was chosen a member of the constitutional convention, and also represented the county in the first and second General Assemblies. In 1803 he was elected to Congress, and continued a member of that body until 1823, with the exception of two years, 1815-1817. He never married, and died about 1837, leaving a large estate. He had six brothers: Matthew, Joseph, William, James, Samuel, and Robert. Joseph lived where his grandson, Joseph Rhea, now lives.; William, in the same neighborhood, and Matthew, just above Bluff City.

Gen. George Rutledge came to the county about 1777 and located on the small stream known as White Top. About three years later, he removed to the farm now occupied by his grandson, William G. Rutledge, where he died in 1913. He commanded a company in Col. Shelby's regiment at the battle of King's Mountain, was a member of the Constitutional Convention of 1796, and the Territorial Assembly, and after the organization of the State, was a member of the Senate until his death. Gen. Evan Shelby located on Beaver Creek, at what was known as the Beaver Dam Bottoms, in 1771, where he erected a fort on an eminence overlooking the site of Bristol. He was born in Wales in 1720, and before coming to Tennessee had taken an active part in the French and Indian War on the borders of Maryland and Pennsylvania. He commanded a company of militia from Sullivan County at the Battle of Point Pleasant and was the leader of the famous Chickamauga expedition. Afterward, he was appointed by Virginia a general of her militia. He died in 1794 and was buried in the old family burial ground at Bristol, which was removed a few years ago. His son, Isaac, was made a lieutenant of militia in 1774, and as such participated in the battle of Point Pleasant. In 1776 he was appointed commissary, which position he held at the battle of Long Island Flats. Prior to the extension of the boundary line between North Carolina and Virginia, he served a term in the Legislature of the latter State. His last public service in Tennessee was as commander of the regiments at King's Mountain. Evan Shelby, Jr., was a major in his brother's regiment at King's Mountain. In 1790 he went to Kentucky, where he was killed by the Indians about three years later. George Maxwell, one of the captains under Isaac Shelby at King's Mountain, came to Sullivan County about 1771. He rose to the rank of Major of militia, and in 1781 was one of the representatives of the county in the Legislature of North Carolina. The Looneys, who were among the first settlers of the county, came from Wales and lived for a time in Virginia. Col. David Looney lived on Muddy Creek, two miles above the Holston, where he erected a blockhouse. Samuel Looney located on the Holston, one mile below the mouth of Beaver Creek.

Of other early settlers, there were in the fork the McKinleys, McCorkles, Scotts, Hodges, Greggs, Torbetts, Dinsmores, Hughes, Kings, Hogans, Sharps, and Grosses. Col. William Christie [Christian] lived near where Kingsport now is, on the south side of Reedy Creek. The same neighborhood was the birthplace of Gen. Edmund Pendleton Gaines. Long Island and many other lands in the vicinity became the property of Richard Netherland, the father of Hon. Joh Netherland. Fort Womack, which stood two miles east of Bluff City, was built by Jacob Womack. It afforded protection for the people who lived in the territory now covered by the Fourth, Sixteenth, Ninth, and Twentieth Civil Districts. It is said that when on one occasion the people were forted here a marriage took place between Hal Massngill and Penelope Cobb. From this union have sprung a large number of descendants, many of whom still reside in the county. The Bledsoes and Beelers located on land adjoining the Shelbys. The Beelers owned the tract of land on Cedar Creek known as Sapling Grove.

At the foot of Eden Ridge (originally Heaton Ridge) on the east side was built a fort known as Heaton's Fort. It was erected by the settlers of Reedy Creek and Cook's Valley and was one of the first structures of the kind in the county. The Yancey Tavern, a famous house of entertainment, was built near this fort. Russell's fort stood on the Snapp's Ferry road, about six miles from Blountville. The first or one of the first mills in the county is said to have been by John Sharp, an Indian trader. It was a small tub-mill and stood on the spot occupied by the mill built a few years later by John Spurgeon at the mouth of Muddy Creek.

As the majority of the first settlers of the county were Scotch-Irish the first religious organizations were Presbyterian, and it is said that as early as 1778 two churches had been constituted. There were Concord and Hopewell. Very little is known of them, except that Samue Doak preached to them for two years preceding 1780. One of them is thought to have been the old "Weaver Church," between Bristol and Union, which, tradition says, was founded by Rev. Joseph Rhea, while on one of his trips to Tennessee. The oldest church of which there is any definite knowledge is New Bethel, which was organized in 1782 by Rev. Samuel Doak. James Gregg, Sr, John Allison, and Francis Hedge, Sr, are supposed to have been the first ruling elders.

The first Methodist family in the county was that of Edward Cox, who lived near Bristol from 1775 to 1777. He then removed to a tract of land which he entered, about one mile northeast of Union Depot. It was at his house that the first conference in Tennessee was held, by Bishop Asbury. The first Methodist society in the county, and, it is believed, in the State, was organized sometime between 1785 and 1790, about two miles from Blountville, where a house of worship known as Acoff's Chapel was erected. it was a log structure of 20 x 30 feet. Among the first members were the Acuffs, Vincents, Crofts, and Hamiltons.

Blountville Circuit was established in 1824, and J. G. H. Speer and Creed Fulton were assigned to it. Among others who had charge of the circuit during its early history were George Horne and D. Fleming, 1825; William Patton, 1826; W. Keener, O. F. Johnson, and George Eakin, 1828; James Y. Crawford, 1829-80; J. B. Doughtry, 1881; R. Gannaway, 1832; W. C. Cumming, 1833; Thomas Rice, 1834-35; R. M. Stevens, 1845; George Eakin, 1846.

The first Baptist society in the county was Kendrick Creek Church, organized by Jonathan Mulkey sometime prior to 1786. Among the first members were Peter Jackson, Anthony Epperson, William Nash, David Parry, and Nicholas Hale. A second church was organized on the Holston in 1788, and in 1795 a congregation was formed at the Ferry Meetinghouse, at Long Island, by Richard Murrell and Abel Morgan. Double Spring Church was also organized by Richard Murrell in 1805. Muddy Creek Church first appears in the minutes of the association in 1826, when it was represented by Amos James and John Spurgeon. In 1846 two new churches were organized, Union and Eden's Ridge. The former was first represented in the association by James White and John Longmire, and the latter by Samuel Bachman and N. Roller.

The first Lutheran immigrants to the Holston Valley located in Sullivan County, Tenn., and Washington County, Va., near the close of the last century. They settled in the neighborhood of Line Church, on or near the headwaters of Reedy Creek; of Buchler's Church, near the headwaters of Cedar Creek; of the Dutch Meeting-house, between the south fork of the Holston River and the Watauga, and or Roller's Church on Falling Creek.

The first ministers who are known to have visited East Tennessee were Revs. Paul Henkel and John G. Butler, and it is thought the first churches were organized by them. The first regular pastors in Sullivan County were Revs. Jacob Zink and Adam Miller. Until 1811 the Lutheran Church in East Tennessee had no regular synodical connection, but in that year they united with the Lutheran Synod of North Carolina, with which they were connected until 1820. The Tennessee Snod was then formed and the churches of East Tennessee remained with this body until January 2, 1851, when the Evangelical Lutheran Holston Synod was organized at Zion's Church in Sullivan County. It embraced ten ministers of whom only three are now living. They were William Hancher, A. J. Brown, J. M. Schaeffer, J. K. Hancher, J. B. Emmert, J. Fleenor, A. Fleenor, J. A. Seneker, J. Cloninger, and J. C. Barb. [Condensed from a sketch by Dr. A. J. Brown.

Sullivan County was the second county formed in what is now Tennessee and included all the part of Washington County lying north of a line formed by the ridge dividing the waters of the Watauga from those of the Holston, and extending from the termination of this ridge to the highest point of the Chimney Top Mountain. The act was passed in October 1779, and in February 1780, the county court was organized at the house of Moses Looney, at which time a commission was presented appointing as justices of the peace Isaac Shelby, David Looney, William Christie, John Dunham, William Wallace, and Samuel Smith. Isaac Shelby exhibited his commission dated November 19, 1779, appointing him Colonel Commandant of the county, and D. Looney of the same date appointing him Major. Ephraim Dunlap was appointed State's attorney, and John Adair, entry-taker. The court adjourned to meet at the house of James Hollis. As the records of this court were almost destroyed during the civil war, but little is now known concerning it. For a few years, the courts were held somewhat in what is now the western part of the county, at the Yancey Tavern, near Eaton's Station, or at the house of Mrs. Shar, near the mouth of Muddy Creek, and possibly at both places.

In 1786, Hawkins County having been erected, the Legislature of North Carolina passed an act to remove the sear of justice to a more central location and appointed Joseph Martin, James McNeil, John Duncan, Even Shelby, Samuel Smith, William King, and John Scott as commissioners to select a site for the county building. Meanwhile, the courts were ordered to be held at the house of Joseph Cole. For some cause, the seat of justice was not permanently located until 1792 when James Brigham conveyed thirty acres of land to John Anderson, George Maxwell, and Richard Gammon, commissioners appointed by the county court to erect a courthouse and jail. These commissioners seem also to have failed to do the duty assigned them, for, in the act of the territorial assembly establishing the town, passed in 1795, James Gaines, John Shelby, Jr., John Anderson, Jr., David Perry, Joseph Wallace, and George Rutledge were appointed to complete the courthouse. This was a hewed-log structure, which stood on a lot nearly opposite the present courthouse. The jail was built in the rear of this lot. Some time between 1825 and 1838 a brick courthouse was erected on the lot occupied by the present one, which was built about 1850. During the war, the latter with its contents was burned, but the walls sustained but little damage and it was rebuilt at a comparatively small cost.
 
3
<i>The Swedish Ancestry of Moses Justus of Schuyler County, Illinois.
The Swedish Ancestry of Moses Justus of Schuyler County, Illinois.
Peter Stebbins Craig. The Swedish Ancestry.... (Washington, DC: Peter S. Craig, 1990).
 
4
A Bear's Last Visit to a Cornfield
A Bear's Last Visit to a Cornfield
Folk tale written by Silas Claiborne Turnbo.
 
5
A WILD BEAR AND TWO BOYS DRINK WATER TOGETHER
By S. C. Turnbo
A WILD BEAR AND TWO BOYS DRINK WATER TOGETHER By S. C. Turnbo
Sarah (Miller) Brown Risley Anderson told this story to her daughter Catherine Risley. And she related the story to Ozark story-teller Silas C. Turnbo. The stor in located in Volume 7 of the Turnbo Manuscripts located on the Springfield-Greene County Library website from Springfield, Missouri. [https://thelibrary.org/lochist/turnbo/V7/ST185.html]
 
6
Administrator's Bond for the Estate of E. W. Chappelle
Administrator's Bond for the Estate of E. W. Chappelle
Louin Chappelle, son of deceased was the principal. Surities included Sam Humphreys, G.W. Lane, J. S. Mebane, Wm. Thomas Meband, and C. C. Graham in the amount of $24,000, this bond was dated 31 Jul 1868. "the said Louin Chappelle he shall well and truly administor according to law and pay the debts of the deceased as far as his assets will extend...." Signed by Louis Chappell, G W Lane, Sam Humphreys, J S Meband, Wm Thos Mebane, and C.C. Graham.
 
7
Amnesty Oath to the United States of America
Amnesty Oath to the United States of America
On 4 Jun 1965, John M. Fee signed an amnesty oath claiming he was a rebel deserter 16 years of age, a private in Ivy's Company of Schnables Regiment, planned to reside in Marion County, Arkansas and follow the occupation of farming.
 
8
Appraisal of Personal Estate of Edward Murphey
Appraisal of Personal Estate of Edward Murphey
The estate was appraised on June 2, 1800, and had the following items listed: two bedsteads and cords [2.00], a "drawenknife [.75]," plow and irons [3.00], 2 iron wedges [1.00], an ax [.83], mattock [.75], 2 hoes [1.00], auger, hand saw, and chisel [1.25], 3 iron pots and hooks [3.75], a hatchel [1.00], a stock lock without a key [.75], 2 pails and buckets [.75], a box of iron and lamp [.25], 1 jug [.15], 1 chest [.33], 1 saddle and bridle [3.33], 2 hammers and nippers [.50], 1 chair [.25], 1 pair of shears [.21], a frying pan, ladle, candle, and candlestick [1.25], 2 pewter dishes and 2 "beasons" [6.00], 10 pewter plates and 10 spoons [4.00], tins and old knives [.33], 1 half bushel [.25], 3 bags [2.00], 1 1/2 yards of thick cloth [1.25], 1 old bag [.50], 4 sticks of "Brazel" wood [1.75], a smooth bore gun [2.00], 2 pair chains and hem back bands & 1 blind bridle [3.33], 1 trunk [.83], 1 bed and furniture [13.00], 1 churn cag and coppress [.33], candle molds [.25], shoe leather [1.50], 1 tub and tray [.50], 1 bed and furniture [14.00], the furling mill and utensils [50.00], 1 dresser [1.00], 1 iron harrow, log chain, and shovel plow [5.00], sorrel mare [50.00], 1 matlock how and pot rack [2.75], 1 cutting box and knife [2.00], and 1 pitchfork [.21]. Appraised by James Finley, Daniel Wiseley, William Phipps, William Finley. The total amount was $184.38 Reported to the Wythe County Court on the 14 Apr 1802.This Inventory and appraisment of the estate of Edward Murphy, deceased being returned is Ordered to be recorded. Teste Robert Crockett, Clerk.
 
9
Battle and Siege of Port Hudson, Louisiana, May 22 – July 9, 1863.
Battle and Siege of Port Hudson, Louisiana, May 22 – July 9, 1863.
Description of the battle and siege at Port Hudson, Louisiana, which was the final engagement in the Union campaign to recapture the Mississippi in the Civil War.
 
10
Bible Family Record of James Erwin Crauswell and his wife, Martha Jane Foster.
Bible Family Record of James Erwin Crauswell and his wife, Martha Jane Foster.
The bible contains birth and marriage records from James & Martha and their children.
 
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Bible of Harold Edward Foster
Bible of Harold Edward Foster
Dad was given this bible at Christmas 1940 by his father. He carried it with him when he was in the Army overseas fighting during World War II. It gave him comfort and saw him safely home.
 
12
Bible of Henry Osborn Smith.
Bible of Henry Osborn Smith.
Contains the births and deaths of Henry, his wife, Deborah Jones and their children.
 
13
Bible of Jesse Harrison Foster
Bible of Jesse Harrison Foster
Jesse's youngest son, Harold, told his daughter Rita that his father kept both his bible and his father, Simeon Castleberry Foster's bible in an old trunk in the front room of their home. And he was warned never to get it out unless his Dad requested him to do so. The bible passed from Jesse to his son, Guy Foster. On a visit in 1981, Guy gave the bible to his niece, Rita Foster Wallace.
 
14
Bible of John Castleberry
Bible of John Castleberry
A list of the ages of John Castleberry's children.
Henry Castleberry was born October 11, 1760.
John Castleberry was born December 19, 1762
Jeremiah Castleberry was born January 23, 1765
Abigail Castleberry was born August 21, 1767
Peter Castleberry was born November 28, 1770
Katharine Castleberry was born March 5, 1773
Elizabeth Castleberry was born May 11, 1775
Jane Castleberry was born January 14, 1778
Sarah Castleberry was born December 16, 1780
James Castleberry was born April 6, 1783
Mary Ann Castleberry born November 10, 1741
 
15
Bible of Simeon Castleberry Foster
Bible of Simeon Castleberry Foster
My great-grandfather Simeon's bible was left to his son, Jesse Harrison Foster. My father, the youngest son of Jesse told me that the Bible was kept in the family chest in the front room of their home. When Jesse died the bible was passed to his son, Guy Foster who passed the bible on to his niece, Rita Foster Wallace in the 1980s.
 
16
Biography of Capt. Joseph Thompson McCracken
Biography of Capt. Joseph Thompson McCracken
 
17
Biography of David Campbell Wallace
Biography of David Campbell Wallace
 
18
Biography of James Frank Thompson
Biography of James Frank Thompson
Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Southern Arkansas (Chicago: Goodspeed Publishing Company, 1890), 971.
 
19
Biography of the Hon. William C. Reno
Biography of the Hon. William C. Reno
Hon. William C. Reno...son of Jonathan and Louisa (Thornton) Reno, both natives of east Tennessee, father born in 1811, the mother in 1813...William Reno grew to manhood in Browning township, spent a year traveling through Kansas, Nebraska and Colorado, and on his return was married to Rebecca A. Wallace of Browning township, in 1860...In 1880, he was elected Representative to the State Legislature, and served one term of two years, having been elected on the Democratic ticket...He has been Justice of the Peace for Browning township for the last sixteen years, and has represented his township on the board of Supervisors for five or six years, and has held the various offices of the county...The Reno family are of French ancestry on the father's side and of Welsh and Dutch on the mother's. The family was established in America five generations ago and all were given to agricultural pursuits. His father was a soldier in the Black Hawk war.
 
20
Capt. James Sallee
Capt. James Sallee
 
21
Capt. Stephen Tompkins Revolutionary War service:
Capt. Stephen Tompkins Revolutionary War service:
 
22
Captured in the Night
Captured in the Night
Folk tale written by Silas Claiborne Turnbo
 
23
Charles St. Clair
Charles St. Clair
Biography of son of David Martin St. Clair.
 
24
Civil War Military Records for Albert Sansing
Civil War Military Records for Albert Sansing
Medical: Cert. of Disability for discharge from C.S.A. states: Fair Complexion

Albert H. Sansing's military records show that he enlisted on May 20, 1861, as a Private/Musician in Capt. Richard W. Jones' Company, Louisiana Volunteers (NOTE: This company was attached to the 14th Regiment Louisiana Infantry by order of the Secretary of War dated September 19, 1861, S. O. No. 157, and became Company I of that regiment.)

Regimental History:
The regiment was organized on June 16, 1861. It was mustered into Confederate service as the 13th Louisiana Regiment at Camp Pulaski, near Amite, Louisiana, on August 24. The unit received orders to proceed to Virginia to join forces with other state units to defend Richmond. The 13th marched to Yorktown in September to contest the advance of the Union Army. On September 21 the War Department changed the unit's designation to the 14th Louisiana Regiment. The men served in the trenches during the siege of Yorktown in April 1862 and fought in the Battle of Williamsburg, May 5, 1862.

From Bergeron, La. Confederate Units, 108-09:
"This regiment was organized June 16, 1861, as the 1st Regiment, Polish Brigade. It was mustered into Confederate service as the 13th Louisiana Regiment at Camp Pulaski, near Amite, on August 24. The regiment received orders to go to Virginia. While en route, some of the men got drunk and rioted at Grand Junction, Tennessee. Five men died before the officers could quell the mutiny. One company was disbanded as a result of the affair [original Company B most likely]. The regiment went to Yorktown in September. On September 21, the War Department changed the regiment's designation to the 14th Louisiana Regiment. The men served in the trenches during the Siege of Yorktown, in April 1862, and fought in the Battle of Williamsburg, May 5, 1862.

MUSTER ROLLS:
--The company muster roll for Albert H. Sansing, dated May 20 to June 30, 1861, shows: Enlisted, When: May 20, 1861; Where: Carroll, LA; By whom: Capt R. W. Jones; Period: For the war. Stated Present by R. W. Pearson, Copyist.
--Second company muster roll for July & Aug 1861, shows: Last paid By whom: Maj. Larkin Smith; To what time: June 30, 1861. Stated Absent with leave by R. W. Pearson, copyist.
--Third company muster roll for "5 Sgt Albert Sansing for Nov & Dec 1861, shows: Last paid & by whom: Capt. Chas DeReignie AQM, C. S. A., To what time: Oct 31, 1861. Stated Present by R. W. Pearson, copyist.
--Fourth company muster roll for 5 Sgt A. H. Sansing for Jan & Feb 1862, shows Present by R. W. Pearson, copyist.
--Fifth company muster roll for 5 Sgt A. H. Sansing for Mar & Apr 1862, shows Present or absent: not stated by R. W. Pearson, copyist.
--Sixth company muster roll for May & Jun 1862, states Present and Remarks state: Reduced to ranks 7 of June from the rank of Sergt. by R. W. Pearson, copyist.
--Seventh company muster roll for July & Aug 1862, shows that Pvt. A. H. Sansing was discharged from service. R. W. Pearson, copyist.

--A. Sansing, Sergt. Co. I, 14 Regt. La. Appears on a Register of Chimborazo Hospital No. 4, Richmond, Virginia. [Sometimes called Louisiana Hospital, Richmond]
Disease: Rheumatisas, chron. Admitted Apr. 6, 1862. Bottom states this is from the Confed. Arch., Chap. 6, File No. 22, page 36.

DISCHARGE DOCUMENTS: ARMY OF THE CONFEDERATE STATES.
Certificate of Disability for Discharge

COVER SHEET, p. 1
Sergt. A. H. Sansing, of Captain F. F. Montgomery Company, (I,) of the 14th La. Regiment of Confederate States Volunteers, was enlisted by Capt. R. W. Jones, of the same Regiment of La Volt's at Oak Grove Carroll Parish on the day of Jan. 7, 1861, to serve [for the] war; he was born in the State of So. Carolina is forty-five . . . Stamped in oval is Record Division, *Rebel Archives* War Department.

p. 2
Sergt. A. H. Sansing, of Captain F. F. Montgomery Company, (I,) of the 14th La. Regiment of Confederate States Volunteers, was enlisted by Capt. R. W. Jones, of the same Regiment of La Volt's at Oak Grove Carroll Parish on the day of Jan. 7, 1861, to serve []for the] war; he was born in the State of So. Carolina, is forty-five years of age, 5 feet, 10 inches high, fair complexion, blue eyes, grey hair, and by occupation when enlisted a Farmer. During the last two months said soldier has been unfit for duty 60 days.......I certify, that I have carefully examined the said Sergt. A. H. Sansing of Captain F. F. Montgomery, Company and find him incapable of performing the duties of a soldier because of Rheumatises Chronic & age (45). Louisiana Hospital, Richmond Aug 20th/62. Dr. F. Forment, Surgeon in charge...Discharged this 23 day of Aug 1862, at Richmond. By order of Brig. Genl Jno. [John] H[enry] Winder, Commanding the Post.

p.3
I CERTIFY, That the within named A. H. Sansing, a private of Captain F. F. Montgomery Company (I) of the 14th Regiment of La. Vols., born in Aberville Dist. in the State of S. C., aged 45 years, 5 feet, 10 inches high, light complexion, Blue eyes, Gray hair, and by occupation a Farmer was enlisted by Capt. R. W. Jones in Carroll Parish, La., on the 2 days of May 1861, to serve for the war, and is not entitled to discharge by reason of Surgeons certificate of disability......The said A. H. Sansing, was last paid by Capt. Oliver to include the 31st day of April 1862 and has pay due from that date to the present day.......There is due to him 3 mos. clothing Dollars traveling allowance from Richmond, Va., the place of discharge, to Ashton, La., the place of enrolment, transportation not being furnished in kind.......There is due him 39 days as Sergeant -- 76 days as Private......He is indebted to the Confederate States $5.00 on account of or for clothing......Given in duplicate near Gordonsville, this 23rd day of Aug. 1862...Signed C. B. Martin, Lieut., Commanding Company.
---------------------------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------------------------------
For pay from 1[st] of May 1862, to 23[rd] of August 1862, being 3 months and 23 days,
at eleven Dollars per month, - - - - - - - - -- - - - - 41.43
For pay for traveling from Richmond to Louisiana, being
12[?] miles, at ten cents per mile, - - - - - - - - - 3.00
3 mos. clothing - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 12.50
Amount 56.93
Deduct for clothing overdrawn...................... 5.00
Balance Paid, - - - - - - 51.93
=============================================================
Received of Major Jno. [unreadable] C.S. Army, this 29 day of August 1862, Fifty-one Dollars and 93 Cents, in full of the above account........................ Signed by A. H. Sansing.
 
25
Confederate Regiment Organized in Boone County[, Arkansas]
Confederate Regiment Organized in Boone County[, Arkansas]
The Fourteenth Arkansas Infantry, C.S.A. was organized in August, 1861, by State senator William C. Mitchell near old Lead Hill Cemetery in Boone County. This article describes the organization and enlistment of the men, supplies gathered and their participation in the battle of Pea Ridge and future battles during the Civil War. [Source: Boone County Historian Volume III, No. 1 (Harrison, AR: Boone County Historical & Genealogy Society, 1980), 14-22.]
 
26
Forty-third Georgia Infantry. Report of Maj. William C. Lester, operations May 1-30, 1864.
Forty-third Georgia Infantry. Report of Maj. William C. Lester, operations May 1-30, 1864.
Report of Major Lester about the movements of 43rd Georgia Infantry between May 1-30, 1864, taken from the Official Records produced by the armies of the United States and the Confederacy, and the executive branches of their respective governments, concerning the military operations of the Civil War, and prisoners of war or prisoners of state. Also annual reports of military departments, calls for troops, correspondence between national and state governments, correspondence between Union and Confederate officials.
 
27
At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
 
28
History of the Noe Family
History of the Noe Family
 
29
HORRIBLE AND PATHETIC
By S. C. Turnbo
HORRIBLE AND PATHETIC By S. C. Turnbo
Mr. Levi Sallee, a brother of Capt. James H. Sallee, furnished the writer the following pathetic account. "It was in the fall of the year 1861. The war was growing hot. Marauding bands were passing to and fro through the country. Murder and robbery was getting to be common. We were living on Pond Fork in Ozark County, Missouri, where Igo Post Office is now. One day 100 men who claimed to be Southerners come down the creek and as the men rode by our house 30 of them stopped. The other 70 men made no halt but rode on down the creek. Part of the men that stopped at our house were very inquisitive and boisterous. There was a strange man at our house of the name of Robertson. This man was not a federal soldier but he wore a federal uniform overcoat. As the 30 men approached the yard gate this man Robertson and my brother, Henderson Sallee, who was 15 years old left the house on a run. My brother ran by our spring of water and up the hillside above the spring some 75 yards where he fell from a gunshot wound from a shot gun, but was not killed outright. Several shots were fired at him and he was wounded in the back from the contents of a shotgun. He had ran southwest from the house. Mr. Roberts, who was sick, ran south and when he was near 60 yards from my brother he stopped on the side of the hill to look back and feeling tottery from the effects of sickness he took hold of a grape vine to assist him to stand when a bullet from a carbine gun in the hands of one of the men hit him in the side under the arm. I actually saw the ball strike him. It was the most dreadful time I ever encountered in that awful period of war and angry times. While my brother was running and while the men was shooting at him and Mr. Roberts we were pleading for the life of Henderson and Mr. Roberts. I was then only a little boy or they would have shot me too. My sister, Ollie Ann, was crying and begging to the men who were doing the shooting to not be so inhumane as to slay her brother, that he was nothing but a boy and was not old enough to take part in the war and he had done nothing to deserve death. At this moment a young man who was something near 20 years of age stepped forward and threatened to shoot my sister when the man who had just shot Roberts interfered and told him that he must not kill the girl and made him desist and compelled him to quit abusing her and would not let him take anything out of the house. Then the heartless young coward replied that he knew what he could do and that he intended to shoot that dead man and wounded boy again and walked up to where the dead body of Roberts lay and shot it in the region of the heart with a pistol and then he shot my wounded brother in the temple and the ball made its exit in the middle of the forehead, stripped the dead man Roberts of his overcoat and pants. Just after this the men mounted their horses and rode on down the creek in the direction the other men had went. Though my brother was yet alive but we knew it was only a question of a few hours before the death angel would relieve his sufferings. We carried him and the dead body of Roberts to the house and at the break of day on the following morning my poor brother breathed his last. Jim Merritte and Dave Marsh dug a grave with two vaults in the graveyard on the Ed Welch place on the creek below where we lived. This cemetery was known then as the Billy Stone graveyard, and the body of my brother was placed in one vault and the body of Roberts in the other. The first burial in this graveyard was that of a little boy, son of Billy Stone, who lived there then. His father and brother had went across the creek to the field to work and the child had attempted to cross the creek on a foot log to follow them but fell off into the water and was drowned. The little boy was not old enough to wear pants and had on a dress. This was many years before the Civil War occurred." [Source: Silas C. Turbo Manuscripts. Springfield-Greene County Library System, online https://thelibrary.org/lochist/turnbo/V4/ST106.html]
 
30
In Memory of Gus H. Crumpler
In Memory of Gus H. Crumpler
Eulogy delivered at Gus H. Crumpler funeral October 6, 1989 by Judge Roger V. Logan, Jr.
 
31
Inventory of James Saintsing's Estate
Inventory of James Saintsing's Estate
The Inventory of the Estate of James Sainsing dece'd returned by Margaret Sainsing his Executrix, on Oath and Ordered to be Recorded.

Two feather beds and furniture
Old ticken with some feathers in it
Chears and chear frame (chairs)
Wollen wheal and cards and one flax wheal (wheel)
Pot and Pot rack and skillet
Chest and one box
Dishes, two bassoons (basins) , 4 plates and 12 spoons & tin pan ___?
Old ax (axe) and one pair iron wedges __? Smoothin iron (smoothing) & weedin hoe &
One grubbin hoe and one plow hoe.
2 Reap hooks
One parcel shoemaker tools
Gun
Water Pales (pails) and washin tub and two trays
Sifter and sieve
White mug
Caskes (casks?) and table
4 forkes and 5 knives
7 head of cattel
14 head of hogs
1 mare and 1 horse
2 wheat sifters
1 drawin knife and augre
1 cows? Bell and 1 small bell
1 parcel of books
1 tea canister
2 powder in tubs and bedstead

her
Margaret M Sainsing [seal]
mark

Bute County February Court 1769
This Inventory was returned into Court by Margaret Sainsing the Executrix on Oath, and the same is ordered to be Recorded. Test. Ben McCulloch, C.C.
 
32
Last Will & Testament of Peter Myers; also includes inventory & appraisal
Last Will & Testament of Peter Myers; also includes inventory & appraisal
Sons: Peter, John, Michael, Henry. Daughters: Molly, wife of Martin Kegley; Barbara, wife of Martin Wyrick; Peggy, Catherine, Leah, and Sarah. Wife: Catherine; Exec: Joseph Crockett, refused to serve and sons Peter and Michael were made administrators; Witnesses: Christopher Brown, John L. Lindenberger, Ludwick Wohlford. Recorded 8 Apr 1817 by Robert Crockett, Clerk.
 
33
Last Will & Testament of William Shephard
Last Will & Testament of William Shephard
Recorded in Accomack County, Virginia, 9 Oct 1718. Proven in open Court of Accomack County by the oaths of Mr. James Kempe, Mrs. Nancy Kempe & Simon Smith, three of the witnesses. NOTE: In an Accomack County Circuit Court on 7 Jul 1922 "ordered that said Record book, to-wit: Book of Wills and Deeds 1715-1729 be copied" because it has been "greatly mutilated by long use and is gradually disintegrating...."
 
34
LATE JOSHUA TURNER - VETERAN OF TWO WARS
Old Soldier, Who Lived in Leavenworth County for Fifty-Five Years, Member of Kansas Legislature
LATE JOSHUA TURNER - VETERAN OF TWO WARS Old Soldier, Who Lived in Leavenworth County for Fifty-Five Years, Member of Kansas Legislature
Leavenworth Times, December 18, 1909, page 3.
 
35
Lewis Adkins, His Ancestors and Descendants
Lewis Adkins, His Ancestors and Descendants
History written by Doris (Adkins) Wells and Iris (Wood) Mayo and published in the York County Genealogical & Historical Society Quarterly in 1990. Lays out the family lines as they had found in their research.
 
36
Marcus Lafayette Hawkins
Marcus Lafayette Hawkins
Source: The Province and the States Vol.7-Weston Arthur Goodspeed-circa 1904
 
37
Marriage of Charlsey Squires & Rufus M. McGuffey
Marriage of Charlsey Squires & Rufus M. McGuffey
27 Jun 1836, Marshall Co, Mississippi
 
38
Marriage Record for Louis Elvin Sansing and Mattie Frank Smith.
Marriage Record for Louis Elvin Sansing and Mattie Frank Smith.
Bond for Marriage License State of Arkansas; County of Chicot. Know all Men by these Presents: That we, Louis Sansing as principal, and J. L. McKenzie as security, are held and firmly bound unto the state of Arkansas…Chicot County, in…sum of One Hundred Dollars…Signed this 1 February 1925…Louis Sansing has this day applied to the Clerk of the County Court of Chicot County, for a License authorizing the solemnization of the Rite of Matrimony between the said Louis Sansing and Miss Mattie Smith. Marriage Affidavit State of Arkansas; County of Chicot. In the Office of the Clerk of the County County. Louis Sansing of the County of Chicot and State of Arkansas...deposes and says that he is the identical person who has this day applied for License of Marriage and that he has arrived at the age of 21 years and that Miss Mattie Smith has arrived at the age of 18 years...the parties for whom said application is made, are now single and unmarried, and may lawfully contract and be joined in marriage...signed Louis Sansing, sworn and subscribed before...George Elder, Clerk of the County Court. Marriage License State of Arkansas; County of Chicot. To Any Person Authorized by Law to Solemnize Marriage—Greeting: You are hereby commanded to solemnize the Rite and publish the Bans of Matrimony between Mr. Louis Sansing of Dermott, Chicot County, Arkansas, aged 21 years, and Miss Mattie Smith of Dermott, Chicot County, Arkansas, aged 18 years…Witness my hand and official seal, this 1 Feb 1925. George Elder, County Clerk. Certificate of Marriage State of Arkansas; County of Chicot. I, Frank Haley, JO, do hereby certify that on the 1 Feb 1925, I did duly and according to law…solemnize the Rite and publish the Bans of Matrimony between the parties therein named. Witness my hand, this 1 Feb 1925. Frank Haley, JP. Filed and duly recorded this 3 Feb 1925. George Elder, County Clerk.

 
39
Military Record for John Wallace (1728-1847)
Military Record for John Wallace (1728-1847)
Private N.C. Militia, fought at Battle of Cowpens, 7 Jan 1781; Battle of King's Mountain.
 
40
Military Record of Joseph A. Cockrell
Military Record of Joseph A. Cockrell
Private, 7th Arkansas Infantry, Co K, C.S.A. Enlisted 26 Jul 1861, Camp Shawn, Arkansas.
 
41
Oath of Allegiance and Amnesty for Henderson Fee
Oath of Allegiance and Amnesty for Henderson Fee
STATEMENT of Henderson Fee, a rebel deserter made at Yellville, Ark before W. N. Braden, Capt. and Dist. Provost Marshal, this fifth day of June 1865. My age is 45 years. I was born in Harlin County and the State of Kentucky. I was in arms against the United States and was a private in Capt Iveys Company Schnabels Regt. I was sworn into the rebel service about the first day of June 1864, by Col. Schnabel in Marion County Ark. for three years. I served in the rebel army until the first day of Nov. 1864 when I was discharged at Yellville, Ark. in the State of Arkansas. At the date of my discharge, I was a private in Capt. Iveys Co. At the date of my enlistment in the rebel army. I was an actual resident of the County of Marion and State of Ark. and still consider that as my home. I intend to reside there in the future and follow the avocation of Farming. I desire to take the Oath of amnesty, prescribed by the Proclamation of His Excellency the President of the United States, of date, December 8th A.D. 1863, if permitted to do so, and will faithfully observe all its terms and conditions.

Subscribed and sworn to before me
the day first above mentioned. Henderson Fee /s/
signed W. N. Braden, Capt.
6th Wis. Vols. Provost
Dist. South West Mo.
 
42
Passports into the Indian Lands to harvest crops
Passports into the Indian Lands to harvest crops
John Wallace, William Wallace, and Moses Justus/Justice had gone into the prohibited Indian lands and started farming before the lands were open for settlement. They "obtained passports 12 Apr 1798-for the purpose of removing their property from the Indian lands and taking care of their grain, that is now growing." NOTE: In 2015 when I was at the Tennessee State Archives I asked to see the original passports but was told by their staff that the only information they had was what Potter had written in her book. Now that I have the exact location of the records in the Papers of Governor John Sevier, I will try again to locate the originals.
 
43
Pension application of Moses Justus, #S32351
Pension application of Moses Justus, #S32351
State of Illinois, Schuyler County: Circuit Court October Term A.D. 1832

On this third day of October A.D. 1832 personally appeared in open Court, before the Judge of the Circuit Court of said County & State now sitting in Rushville (the same being a court of record) Moses Justus a resident of the County of McDonough and State of Illinois aged 77 years, who being first duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the Act of Congress passed June 7th 1832. That he entered the service of the United States under the following named officers and served as herein stated: Entered the service as a volunteer in 1774 (month & day not recollected) in the County of Mecklenburg in the State of North Carolina, under Captain John Fifer [sic, John Phifer], Lieutenant Samuel Patton, Ensign William Houston, as a volunteer served three months, marched to Cross Creek in North Carolina about 100 miles and was there discharged by Samuel Patton he being Captain, Captain John Phifer having been promoted to Col.. Soon after returning from Cross Creek aforesaid the place of discharge to Mecklenburg aforesaid, he entered the service again as a volunteer at the County of Mecklenburg aforesaid in July 1774 as well as he recollects under Captain Caleb Phifer, Lieutenant William Houston Ensign's name not recollected, commanded by Colonel John Phifer and marched to the Cherokee nation at the Valley Towns, after serving three months returned to Salisbury in North Carolina about 14 miles from Mecklenburg aforesaid, and was there discharged and paid. That he entered the service a third time as a substitute in Captain Haven's Company (Lieutenant & Ensign's names not recollected) in the Third Regiment Commanded by Colonel Tinnen, General Lincoln commander in chief, we marched to Stono 20 miles from Charleston and was in a Battle at Stono, and was discharged there after serving three months. Afterwards he removed to Virginia & entered the service a fourth time in February following at New River in Montgomery County Virginia, as a volunteer under Captain James Newell, Lieutenant William Glaves [?], Ensign Richard Muse, Colonel Preston commanding, we marched to Haw River in North Carolina below the Moravian Towns had a skirmish at Whitesells mills [sic, Wetzel's mill] was defeated, then marched to Guilford Court House in North Carolina and was there discharged. That he has no documentary evidence, and that he knows of no person whose testimony he can procure who can testify to his service; and that he hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any State.

Questions by the Court

1st When and in what year were you born? In the year 1753 in the State of Maryland

2nd Have you any record of your age and if so where is it? I have a record of my age at my house where I now reside.

3rd Where were you living when called into service: where have you lived since the Revolutionary War and where do you now live? I was living at the time I volunteered into the service, in the State of North Carolina, afterwards removed to Virginia, then removed to East Tennessee, then to West Tennessee, then to the State of Indiana, and then to Schuyler County in the State of Illinois and then to McDonough County in the said State of Illinois where I now live

4th How were you called into service; were you drafted; did you volunteer or were you a substitute, and if in a substitute, for whom? I entered service as a volunteer minute man and served as a volunteer during the whole of my Service, except one tour of three months, which I served as a Substitute for a man whose name I do not recollect under Captain Havens.

5th State the names of some of the regular officers who were with the troops when you served, such Continental and militia regiments as you can recollect and the general circumstances of your service. General Lincoln was with the troops among whom I served, also Generals Rutherford & McDowell and Colonel Preston, Tinnen and Phifer of the Militia

6th Did you ever receive a discharge from the service, and if so, by who was it given and what has become of it? I received a discharge from Captain Fifer, and one from Captain Havens, and have lost them both, was not careful to preserve them, thinking them of no Consequence.

7th State the names of persons to whom you are known in your present neighborhood and who can testify as to your character for veracity and their belief in your services as a soldier in the revolution. I am acquainted with William Skiles, George Skiles, and Samuel Bogart, who can testify as to my character for veracity & behavior but am not acquainted with any person, who can testify to my Services in the revolution from his own knowledge. Sworn to & subscribed this 3rd day of October A.D. 1832.

S/ Richard M. Young, Circuit Judge of the 5th Judicial Circuit of the State of Illinois

S/ Moses Justice

[Samuel Bogart, a clergyman of McDonough County, and George and William Skiles gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

State of Illinois, County of Schuyler

On this 3rd day of June 1833 personally appeared in open Court before the Court of County

Commissioners now sitting (the same being a Court of Record) Moses Justus a resident of McDonough County and the State of Illinois aged now 78 years who being first duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following declaration in Amendment to a declaration made by him on the said third day of October 1832 in order to obtain the benefit of the Act of Congress passed June 7th 1832.

That he entered the service of the United States under the following named officers and served as herein stated. That he volunteered a minute man sometime in the summer of 1774 (day and month not recollected) and the County of Mecklenburg in the State of North Carolina. That in the month of March 1775,

1. He was called into actual service of the United States as a private under Captain John Fifer, Lieutenant Samuel Patton Ensign William Houston and served as a volunteer three months, during which time he marched from Mecklenburg aforesaid to Cross Creek in said State about 100 miles and was there discharged by Samuel Patton then Captain, Captain John Fifer having been promoted to Col. That the Statement made in his original declaration of having entered the Service as a volunteer 1774, is the time when he volunteered as above stated, and not the time when he actually entered the service. And that he entered the service as stated in this his amended declaration. [Probably 1776 when the Scotch Tories was defeated at Moore's Creek Bridge on their way to meet the British forces anticipated at Wilmington, NC.]

That he entered the service of the United States a second time at Mecklenburg aforesaid in July 1775

2. Under Captain Caleb Fifer, Lieutenant William Houston (Ensign's name not recollected) Commanded by Colonel John Fifer and marched to the Cherokee Nation at the Valley Towns and from thence returned to Salisbury in North Carolina and was there discharged having served three months that the statement made in his original declaration that he entered the service in July 1774 a second time is incorrect, and that he entered the service in July 1775 as above stated. That he entered the service a third time at Mecklenburg aforesaid in June or July 1780 [Probably the summer of 1776 in which a campaign was waged against the Cherokee Nation.]

3. A Substitute and private in Captain Havens Company (Lieutenant's and Ensign's names not recollected) of the Regiment commanded by Colonel Tinnen, General Lincoln Commander in chief and marched to Stono about 20 miles from Charleston and was in a Battle at Stono and was there discharged having served three months; [The Battle of Stono was fought in 1779, not 1780 as asserted by the claimant.]
 
44
Pension for William T. Foster for Military Service.
Pension for William T. Foster for Military Service.
William T. Foster applied to the State of Arkansas for a pension from his service in the Civil War. He served as a Private in Company I, 31st Louisiana Volunteer Infantry, C.S.A. and honorably discharged on 15 Mar 1865. In the file was the application signed by William T. Foster and dated 12 Jun 1903; Proof of service attested to by W. H. Smith and R. F. Farrar and sworn before R. R. Radford, Ashley County County Clerk; Evidence of Physician by W. S. Norman, MD, saying that he is unable to perform manual labor because of "rheumatism & old age" dated 12 Jun 1903; Pension board approval of $50.00 pension on 6 Aug 1903; Application for an increase of pension on 13 Jul 1908; Evidence of Physician by E. M. Scott MD, saying that he is unable to perform manual labor because of "his age, 85 yrs" dated 13 Jul 1908; and Pension board approval for an increase to $100.00 dated 6 Aug 1908.
 
45
Probate files of William Truett Foster Estate
Probate files of William Truett Foster Estate
Inventory and Appraisal of the estate, 27 Mar 1823. Also includes the Settlement & distribution of the estate, 5 Jan 1826.
 
46
Probate of the William Phipps Estate
Probate of the William Phipps Estate
 
47
Quit claim deed between John Ives and William Shepard Foster
Quit claim deed between John Ives and William Shepard Foster
Settles boundary line between John Ives and William Shepard Foster. Witnessed by B. Smith. Recorded in Craven County Court at the June term 1791.
 
48
Resignation Documents of Captain William C. Pace, 14th Arkansas Volunteer Infantry, C.S.A.
Resignation Documents of Captain William C. Pace, 14th Arkansas Volunteer Infantry, C.S.A.
Contains (1) handwritten resignation of William C. Pace, Captain, 14 Regt. Arkansas Volunteer Infantry, C.S.A. (2) Affidavit from J. B. Carlisle, Acting Surgeon stating that Pace's prior "injury to some of his ribs on both sides were fractured and also injury of the Sternum"...recent exposure has so impaired his general health as to incapacitate him for the performance of duty and...will not be able to resume his duties during his unexpired term of service." (3) other cover sheets.
 
49
Revolutionary War Pension file for John Fee, Pennsylvania.
Revolutionary War Pension file for John Fee, Pennsylvania.
Pensioner was John Fee's second wife Jane (Jackson) Fee dated 31 Dec 1850.
 
50
Sale of 100 acres by William S. Foster.
Sale of 100 acres by William S. Foster.
William S. Foster to John Oglesby both of Craven Co, NC...for the sum of 300 pounds...center piece of land being and lying in Craven County and on the south side of Neuce River and in the fork of Brices Creek containing 100 acres..begins at a white oak on the south side of the west prong of Brices Creek. Signed: William Shephard Foster. Witnesses: William Ives & John "Pollock" Ives; witness oath Sept 1785 by Wm Ives. Recorded by Wm Bryan, CC Sept Craven County Court, 1785.
 

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